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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
's release. >> i submitted a memorandum, due to the effect that mr. mandela ought to be released that we're bringing a bigger martyr of him every day he stays in prison, and that his international aclaim and status would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any more. unfortunately, it continued on. >> here we have a man 27 years in prison. the day he was released he displayed the acumen and attitude of an american who has been a president before. amazing. amazing what insight he had into the minds of people. and for that matter into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the negotiation process that led to a peaceful transfer of power was mandela's insistence that there need be no losers. that all could read. >> we handed over power. but we were not capitulating. you do not capitulate and surrender when you do the right thing. you liberate yourself. that's what we did. it was not a capitulation. it was liberation. >> reporter: and the what month says he was liberated quotes from a statement that nelson mandela made during his trial all those years ag
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
. he reminded me of my grandfather. had uncanny resemblance. i told him that. i said, mr. mandela, i showed him a picture of my grandfather, he said, we're all brothers. my grandfather had passed away by then. it was just his constant humility. and i think one of the things that i look at the nexus of the anc and naacp our struggle that was continuing in of -- going on in south africa there is a necks us that really made us as brothers and we had such an 'feign tee with him. affinity with him. he meant a lot to me. >> i think we would miss an opportunity if we treated everything that he accomplished, everything he was as something that we look back on. as the past. in fact he left homework for us to do. he left -- not only in south africa but also for us here. how do we relate. the things that we get upset about that we don't speak to people about. the fights we have, look what he forgave. look how he reconciled. the truth of the reconciliation in south africa still one of the most amazing things that's ever happened in the world. to face their accused and do something better. >> he
want to show you something before we go. within minutes of mr. mandela's death, a few flowers were placed outside his home. look at it now. in the days to come, there will be more. >> that is for sure. byron pitts tonight. thank you. >>> and some dramatic pictures coming in from overseas, from ukraine. hundreds of thousands of people filling the central square there in the capital. angry that their president is now forging closer ties with russia and moving away from the west. a landmark statue of vladimir lenin was toppled over. people taking turns taking aim. >>> and from iran tonight, state tv is reporting that u.n. inspectors have begun their work. it comes after that landmark short-term nuclear agreement. this weekend in washington, meantime, president obama giving the odds of achieving a long-term agreement with iran 50/50 at best. >>> meantime, the pentagon under fire tonight for its decision to buy combat helicopters made in russia. lawmakers on both sides, asking, why not made in america? here tonight, abc's aditi roy. >> reporter: tonight, new questions arise as to why th
to former south african president nelson mandela. he passed away last thursday at the age of 95. mr. mandela serve as south africa's first black president from 1994 to 1999. he spent 27 youth in prison before he was elected president. >> the house will wish to know how we intend to proceed today. defense questions will be postponed to next monday. the present list of questions will be carried over. there will not be another shuffle to the table office will announce consequential changes shortly. this is a special day for special tribute to a special statesmen, nelson mandela. i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. tributes may continue until 10 p.m. there will be no end of day adjournment debate. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela, taking place in westminster hall at 2 p.m. on thursday december 12. i call the prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime, a pivotal figure in the history of south africa and the world,
. warmly welcomed at the white house. >> mr. mandela, a man who embodies the hopes of millions. >> reporter: it was bill clinton with whom he would develop the closest bond. mandela, now president of south africa, visited the white house during the darkest days of the clinton presidency. he gave his friend a boost. >> our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. >> reporter: this friendship clinton treasures to this day. >> we just hit it off. i just adored him. he was always, you know, he was a true friend. >> reporter: mandela, as an ex-president, met with george w. bush in 2005. but there was no love lost there. mandela was one of bush's harshest critics when it came to iraq. when we talked to bush about the ailing mandela earlier this year, there were no hard feelings. >> he promoted freedom. he was a really great leader. he was smart and capable. and made his mark. >> reporter: obama only met mandela once. ever so briefly as a junior senator. but his connection may be the most profound. it was mandela, he says, who awakened him to the wider world. inspiring him to political ac
. >> i was there at the right time. i had the privilege to cook mr nelson mandela's first meal out of imprisonment. they were there to discuss negotiations for his relief. >> 3 o'clock in the afternoon there was a lot of strange characters with weapons, checking you out, making sure that the food that your people taste the food. >> the meal itself was simple. the south african version with mixed berries. >> what's it like for you to create this? >> this is the most important meal i have cooked in my life. it shows freedom, it shows forgiveness and for me it's an emotional and special meal and day for me. >> once the food had gone out marquets said he was able to sneak a peak. >> i had a chance to get out and look and show him. he looks very relaxed. same demeanour, same beautiful smile that he had and forgiving. that is the picture that i saw and the forgiveness in his eyes. >> simply but special. >> simply meal, permanent inference. >> so it was just, you know, an unbelievable experience. once every century you'll see a man like nelson mandela who can change the world. it was a be
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
of december. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime. we are here to celebrate his character, his achievements, and his legacy. condolence books have been organized. tos evening we will fly south africa to attend the service and johannesburg. and his royal highness, the prince of wales, will be there for the funeral. his family, his friends, and the millions in south africa, and those around the world, our morning and today. mourning him today. though humanity bears ever upwards, away from brutality. but it is not so. progress is not just handed down. it is one through struggle -- struggle.h nelson mandela was the embodiment of that struggle. the evil ofr forget apartheid and its affect. separate buses, separate schools, and even separate pews in church. interracial relationships banned. a rolling which that explained man's inhumanity to man. this was made possible by extreme brutality, and some of this was by south african authorities. ,is journey spanned six decades through nearly three days of incarceration, through his negotiations that led to t
for lawmakers. the flag of the u.s. capitol remains at half staff in honor of nelson mandela. the white house announced that the president and mr. obama -- and mrs. obama will be joined by presidents carter, clinton, and george w. bush honoring nelson mandela. we're going to begin with your comments and calls on a recent survey. a pew research study indicating power has declined. join in on the conversation, the lines -- you can join us on our social media, send us a tweet or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org . or join us on facebook. let's begin with a look at some of the newspapers. front page of "the washington post" has a scene from johannesburg. nelson mandela began the journey from tribal air to revolutionary icon. this from inside "the new york times," -- details from inside "the new york times." there is a new poll we want to draw your attention to. it essentially looks at the role we play in the world. here are some of the details -- support for u.s. global engagement is already nearing historic low and has fallen further. the public thinks that the nation does too much to solve
to nelson mandela. on board air force one with president and mrs. obama, president george wurks bush and first lady laura bush and former secretary of state hillary clinton. on the way to south africa, they gathered together in the plane's conference room telling their stories that spanned three presidential administrations. president's clinton and carter are traveling separately to johannesburg. the last time these presidents were all together was in april at the opening of the george w. bush presidential library, but this event in a foreign country will mean much greater security concerned. sources involved in planning president clinton's prim to the funeral of israel prime minister rabin, and the funeral of pope john paul ii tells cnn it decrease nerve-racking to depend on a foreign country. >> they do a lot of planning and they're very good at this. the south africans have challenges, in addition to security, logistical challenges. >> reporter: the memorial service will take place in a soccer stadium that holds 90,000 people. more than 90 world leaders are expected to attend. lea
to go before reaching the south pole. >>> president obama and mrs. obama left washington a short time ago. on "face the nation" yesterday bob schieffer focused mandela's life. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> i loved the show how you started with maya angelou and ended with the poem she had written for him because it so brilliantly captured his life and what it meant. >> she is an amazing person in her own right. >> i think so too. >> when i called her last week and asked her to be on i thought -- she's not in the best of health. she can't travel very much and she said, no i'll do it because i want to. and then i found autoout she had written this poem. she didn't tell us. she told us on the show when the state department asked her to do this not to disclose it for -- until 48 hours after he was dead. >> how did you get gayle king to do it? >> you know that was an e-mail from bob schieffer to gayle king. yeah. what they're saying in south africa, though today about him while they're grieving, of course they're also celebrating. i saw one woman wh
the warmth of mr. obama's performance. he looks good. >> welcome to "cbs this morning saturday," i'm anthony mason. >> and i'm venita meyer. >>> the lighting of the christmas tree became the celebration of the life of nelson mandela. >> senior white house correspondent bill plant joins us with more on that. >> reporter: good morning, well washington has temporarily put aside its usual battles over health care and the budget to pay tribute to nelson mandela. but as you mentioned, there was one annual presidential tradition yesterday, which did not go unobserved. >> three, two, one -- [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: president obama joined by his family pushed the button to bathe the national christmas tree in a warm holiday glow. and later remembered the man he says has been a major inspiration. >> and this year we give a special measure of gratitude for nelson mandela a man who championed that generosity of spirit. in his life he blessed us with tremendous grace and unbelievable courage. and we are all privileged to live in a world touched by his goodne
] >> thank you so much. thank you, mr. president. you've been very generous. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> president obama has taken off for south afrika to attend a memorial service for nelson mandela. board w. bush is also a air force one. former president jimmy carter is planning to join the group in johannesburg. george h.w. bush is the only living president will not attend. his spokesman says he's no longer able to travel long distances. they will join dozens of other dignitaries and tens of thousands of mourners at the stadium. nelson mandela will be buried december 15 following a state funeral. back in house is session today. .hey will begin the day at noon legislative work will get here at 2:00. boats -- vote is scheduled today. today washington journal spoke with a capital reporter about what they are planning to work on this week. >> ian swanson, thank you for joining us. a number of reports have put out, we are expecting a deal as early as this week. what will that look like? >> it wi
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)